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Nothing else is known at this time about this affair. In Anderson sold some land to John McCurry who had been living adjacent to him. Supposedly John's wife, Artie, was related to the Moores. Rhoda, wife of John Moore, was reportedly her sister. John Moore was Anderson's uncle--his mother's brother. Later that year, Anderson took his family and moved to Mohamet, Illinois, where there were jobs to be had.

He retained ownership of his remaining land on Beaver Creek. Holt, who had followed her there from Kentucky.

In late Anderson moved all of his family except his oldest son, Breck who moved to Iowa , back to Beaver Creek. Some say he was homesick for Kentucky, other that he went back to protect his property. John McCurry was not happy with the land boundaries and claimed a few more acrews than Anderson understood it to be.

A shooting wr developed on Beaver Creek. McCurry claimed that Anderson shot his livestock and burned his barn. He did not often make this trip even thought he lived only two hills away. Anderson was not a large man, about 5'8" tall. When he went to their house that time he must have been feuding because he was riding on his horse and had his rifle with him.

He always took his gun a Winchester rifle with him whever he went. Both men, Anderson Moore and John McCurry, were fearful for their lives and had to stay hidden to keep from being shot. This story is told by Melvin Holt, who was Andy's son and the grandson of Anderson Moore: "The next to the last time I was back in Kentucky I went down there where that crossing was and stood right out in the middle of the creek and thought about the shooting.

In that country the hills come down to a V, and right down at the bottom of that V is a creek and the road follows the creek. At that time--now it's different--at that time you had to cross the creek, oh, a dozen times, in order to go almost nowhere. The creek was just winding, you see. McCurry and another fellow was cross the creek, the first one down below Grandpa Moore's house. The house was quite a ways bck from the cross, but they had powerful rifles.

The house had a room upstairs--it wasn't fit to stay in or live in, but you could crawl around up there. And on the one end, down creek-wise was a window, possibly 20X30". If I remember right, it had a swinging door on it, that you could open or shut. The window looked out on the creek that flowed across the road ahead.

My Dad was in the loft of that house, shooting out the window. That's how near Dad came to killing a man. Dad fired one shot, and it hit McCurry-he was carrying his gun across his chest--and it hit the gun right about where it would have hit his heart. It hit the gun solid and the bullet shot off and missed the whole thing. It hit the gun--providential, of course.

Dad said McCurry dcropped off his horse and he thought he had killed him for sure, and got this terrible feeling inside, that he had actually killed a man. But then McCurry must have been stunned for a minute, ecause he got up and he and the other fellow ran off. We were glad Dad didn't kill him, afterwards. Later on, of course it kind of slowed down, but this McCurry hired a man who shot my Grandpa as he was going down that same road. He was up in the mountains somewhere and shot right down, hit him right in the groin, and he bled to death in just no time.

A terrible thing. It sure knocked us out. At this time McCurry had three daughters, some quite young. Three young men desired these girls. The Moore boys were about 24 years old. Nelson was a son of Anderson's sister, Rhoda, who had married Calvin Moore who was a brother to Anderson's mother. Monroe was probably Nelson's cousin, likely a son of Calvin's brother, John Moore and his wife Rhoda.

Rhoda could have been a sister to Artie McCurry. Clifton Branham was a notorious killer who had recently got out of the Federal Pen at Frankfort. He had been serving time for killing his own wife after she accused him of molesting their daughter. Clifton "got religion" while in prison. He became a preacher and was a fine mucisian on the guitar. There were lots of Branhams living on Robinson Creek. John McCurry was Clifton's cousin. Clifton's family now lived just over the border between Kentucky and Virginia, in the town of Pound in Dickenson County, Virginia.

He had a daughter with whom I fell in love. Her father could not stay at home because of a feud between him and the Moore family living just opposite. They had shot him, killed his property, burned his barn and fencing and stirring up all kinds of devilment, sweraing that they would take his life before they quit. But it came to pass that Anderson Moore got killed and that broke up the next.

Men Arrested for Assassinating Anderson Moore

Either for his wealth or personal resons, a neighbor, John McCurry, wanted him killed. McCurry had heard of the reputation of Clifton Branham which seemed well known. He was reputed to be a real bad man. Since the victim was unknown to Clifton, he hired two relatives of some degree to the victim, Harry Lee Monroe and Nelson Moore, giving each of them one of his other daughters, Lila Delilah and Lily.

By hiding in the woods they waylaid their quarry. As they continued down the creek, Clifton, who was hiding in the woods with a high powered rifle, shot and killed Anderson to death on his horse. Anderson fell and left Charlie sitting on the horse. Charlie was not hurt. Nelson and Monroe had fulfilled their role by pointing Anderson out to Clifton so that he might shoot the right man, probably while Anderson was talking to old John Moore.

Anderson Moore was buried at Beaver Creek. His enemies hated him so badly that they shot up his grave the same night that he was buried and threatened his wife, Lurany. After the shooting, McCurry went to Luranys home and moved out all the family's possessions. Thus Lurany spent the night outside the house, protecting the family's things. As soon as she could thereafter she packed up the family--Charles, Chamilous K , Alex and Groer and went to Somers, Iowa, where her oldest son Breck, had a farm.

They went by train. When they arrived at the station to leave, the staionmaster told her that her boxes were too big. They had to make the boxes smaller and repack everything before they could get on the train. Charleie had to do this as he was the oldest. They had to leave many household items behind including many beautiful quilts which were passed on to her daughters, Lizzy Newsom and Liza Holt.

Clifton took his prizes, as did Nelson and Monroe. They were to take a train and leave the country. It so happened that one of Ant Moore's friends had heard of their plans and went to Tay low? Allen, then Sheriff of Floyd County at Prestonburg, the county seat, and told him of their plans. Knowing they had already left by steamboat and that he had only a short time to apprehend them, he deputized another, and known there was no other boat leaving in time, they ran down to the rive and cut loose someone's log raft and floated down to Paintsville, and there arrested the three men and three girls at the depot where they awaited a passenger train to Catlettsburg near Ashland, KY.

They took them back to Prestonsburg, where they were confined in the county jail. The Wise County, Virginia authorities heard, or were informed, of the capture of Clifton and he was promptly extradited to Virginia. There he was tried and convicted of the earlier crimer of murdering his wife, Nan Branham, for which he paid the supreme penalty by being hanged.

The girls, as far as is known, were exonerated. Harry Lee monroe and Nelson Moore were given two years in prison for their part in the slaying of Ant Moore.

Branham's Due

It is not known at this time what they burned. Frank Parsons, in his account, relates that he took Lurany Moore and her family up Mud Creek to Harold on Big Sandy in like manner in which he took Clifton and company, and that they also took the steamboat to Paintsville, where they boarded the train. After lengthy trials each was found Guilty of Murder and received life sentences in the State Penitentiary.

Nelson was sentenced March 11, Amont other witnesses for the state were John Moore; Nelson and G. The case came to trial January 7, On January 18, the State chagesd Monroe Moore. These two cases continued hand in hand until January 21, , when they had to continue the trials in the next term of court. The second session of the Court met on April 4. On April 13, the Court disucmissed the case against Monroe Moore. McCurry was the father of the whole mess--that is, the fighting.

Not on your life! Dick Toe never received either the money or the corn. What happened did not come fully to light for some fifty years She was a brilliant woman although she never had any schooling. She couldn't write, but she could read printing. I stayed with her for about two years while I went to school in Somers, Iowa. She was a wonderful person.

My mother was the oldest one of her fourteen children. Refer to documented account below from the Anderson Moore Family Record. He married Lurany Higgins, who was born April 27, A feud over land boundaries developed between a Mr. McCurry and the Moore family. On February 26, , Anderson was shot and killed while riding his horse, by a man hired by McCurry. Anderson Moore was 50 years old when he died.

One of Anderson's sons, Charles, was with him on the horse at the time, but was not hurt. After the shooting, McCurry went to the Moore home and moved out all the family's possessions. Thus Lurany spent the night outside the house, protecting the family's things. As soon as she could thereafter, she packed up the family, including Charles, Chamilous, Alexander, and Grover, and went to Somers, Iowa, where Breckenridge had a farm.

Then they moved to a farm near Rinard, Iowa, where the boys grew up. The man who shot Anderson [Clifton Branham] was subsequently hanged, and McCurry himself was later shot by person or persons unknown. This is the story as it was passed down by Benjamin Franklin Parsons, who was hired by the trio of criminals to take them by wagon drawn by mule team to catch a steamboat and then a train to Catlettsburg in a grand getaway scheme. The same Parsons also conveyed Lurany Moore to catch the steamboat to Whitehouse, then train to Iowa. Hoskins, who in turn got the story from her great Uncle Benjamin Franklin Parsons, who was considered an authority on the subject.

At the time, there lived in the head of right Beaver creek, Floyd County, which is just across the hill from the Long Fork of Shelby Creek, one Anderson Ant Moore, who was quite wealthy. Either for his wealth or personal reasons a neighbor, John McCurry in some areas it is spelled McCreary , wanted him Moore killed.

McCurry had heard of the reputation of Clifton Branham, which seemed well known. He was reputed to be a real bad man. By hiding in the woods they waylaid their quarry. One day as Ant Moore was returning from the mill where he had his turn of corn ground into meal, he stopped in the yard of "Old" John Moore, whose wife was Rhodie.

Ant was talking to "Old" John when Clifton, hidden in the woods, shot and killed him with the high powered rifle from a distance later measured of one-half mile. They were to take a train and leave the country. It so happened that one of Ant Moore's friends had heard of their plans and went to Taylor Allen, then Sheriff of Floyd County at Prestonsburg, the county seat, and told him of their plans.

Knowing they had already left by steamboat and that he had only a short time to apprehend them, he deputized another, and knowing there was no other boat leaving in time, they ran down to the river and cut loose someone's log raft and floated down to Whitehouse, and there arrested the three men and three girls at the depot where they were awaiting a passenger train to Catlettsburg, Kentucky, taking them back to Prestonsburg, where they were confined in the county jail. The girls, as far as is known, were exonerated. Harry Lee and Nelson Moore were given two years in prison for their part in the slaying of Ant Moore.

This, it is said, he did. Nothing further of this crime or anyone punished is known at the present time. It can be here noted that the same Benjamin Franklin Parsons, who brought the Branham party to catch the steamboat, also brought the widow of Ant Moore down Mud Creek to Harold, Kentucky, where she and her children took the steamboat down the Big Sandy to Whitehouse. From there they traveled by train to the state of Iowa, where an older son lived.

One Moore Feud in Eastern KY in Topic, pictures and information - codidabopa.gq

In his published memoirs, Clifton Branham confessed to the murder of Anderson Moore. Anderson Moore was on horseback on his way to the home of his daughter and son-in-law, Lizzie and Noah Newsom, when he was shot and killed by Clifton Branham. He had a daughter with whom I fell in love. Her father could not stay at home because of a feud between him and the Moore family living just below him. They had shot him, killed his property, burned his barns and fencing, and kicked up all kind of deviltry, and swearing that they would take his life before they let up. But it came to pass that Anderson Moore got killed and that broke up the next.

His property was killed, his house and barn burned. Haley and I got married and started to Michigan, taking a boat at the mouth of Big Mud, a drummer on the boat knew me. He got off at Prestonsburg and told them that we had gone down the river. The others took a skiff and followed us to White House where they arrested me, and brought me back to Prestonsburg jail, then they took me to Lexington, where I remained two months, and the officers from Virginia came after me and brought me here to the Wise County jail, to be tried for the murder of my wife.

Fleming, and at another time shot at John Fleming, intending to kill them for abusing my sister, but missed them. I beat another woman and threw her over a cliff, leaving her for dead, but she recovered. I premeditatedly shot to kill Rant Smallwood, but failed. I received part of the money that killed Henry Vanover.

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I killed my wife for accusing me of my daughter. I killed Anderson Moore and destroyed his property on Beaver. Good by! Violence was nothing new to the family of Anderson Moore. His father, Henderson Moore, had been shot and killed in supposedly by mistake.

Nothing else is known at this time about this affair. In Anderson sold some land to John McCurry who had been living adjacent to him. Supposedly John's wife, Artie, was related to the Moores. Rhoda, wife of John Moore, was reportedly her sister. John Moore was Anderson's uncle--his mother's brother.

Later that year, Anderson took his family and moved to Mohamet, Illinois, where there were jobs to be had. He retained ownership of his remaining land on Beaver Creek. Holt, who had followed her there from Kentucky. In late Anderson moved all of his family except his oldest son, Breck who moved to Iowa , back to Beaver Creek. Some say he was homesick for Kentucky, other that he went back to protect his property. John McCurry was not happy with the land boundaries and claimed a few more acres than Anderson understood it to be.

A shooting war developed on Beaver Creek. McCurry claimed that Anderson shot his livestock and burned his barn. He did not often make this trip even thought he lived only two hills away. Anderson was not a large man, about 5'8" tall.

When he went to their house that time he must have been feuding because he was riding on his horse and had his rifle with him. He always took his gun a Winchester rifle with him wherever he went. Both men, Anderson Moore and John McCurry, were fearful for their lives and had to stay hidden to keep from being shot. In that country the hills come down to a V, and right down at the bottom of that V is a creek and the road follows the creek. At that time--now it's different--at that time you had to cross the creek, oh, a dozen times, in order to go almost nowhere.

The creek was just winding, you see. McCurry and another fellow was cross the creek, the first one down below Grandpa Moore's house. The house was quite a ways back from the cross, but they had powerful rifles. The house had a room upstairs--it wasn't fit to stay in or live in, but you could crawl around up there. And on the one end, down creek-wise was a window, possibly 20X30". If I remember right, it had a swinging door on it, that you could open or shut. The window looked out on the creek that flowed across the road ahead. My Dad was in the loft of that house, shooting out the window.

That's how near Dad came to killing a man. Dad fired one shot, and it hit McCurry--he was carrying his gun across his chest--and it hit the gun right about where it would have hit his heart. It hit the gun solid and the bullet shot off and missed the whole thing. It hit the gun--providential, of course. Dad said McCurry dropped off his horse and he thought he had killed him for sure, and got this terrible feeling inside, that he had actually killed a man.

But then McCurry must have been stunned for a minute, because he got up and he and the other fellow ran off. We were glad Dad didn't kill him, afterwards. Later on, of course it kind of slowed down, but this McCurry hired a man who shot my Grandpa as he was going down that same road. He was up in the mountains somewhere and shot right down, hit him right in the groin, and he bled to death in just no time. A terrible thing. It sure knocked us out. At this time McCurry had three daughters, some quite young. Three young men desired these girls. The Moore boys were about 24 years old.

Nelson was a son of Anderson's sister, Rhoda, who had married Calvin Moore who was a brother to Anderson's mother. Monroe was probably Nelson's cousin, likely a son of Calvin's brother, John Moore and his wife Rhoda. Rhoda could have been a sister to Artie McCurry. Clifton Branham was a notorious killer who had recently got out of the Federal Pen at Frankfort.

He had been serving time for killing his own wife after she accused him of molesting their daughter. Clifton "got religion" while in prison. He became a preacher and was a fine musician on the guitar. There were lots of Branhams living on Robinson Creek. John McCurry was Clifton's cousin.

Clifton's family now lived just over the border between Kentucky and Virginia, in the town of Pound in Dickenson County, Virginia. Her father could not stay at home because of a feud between him and the Moore family living just opposite. They had shot him, killed his property, burned his barn and fencing and stirring up all kinds of devilment, swearing that they would take his life before they quit.

Either for his wealth or personal reasons, a neighbor, John McCurry, wanted him killed. McCurry had heard of the reputation of Clifton Branham which seemed well known. Since the victim was unknown to Clifton, he hired two relatives of some degree to the victim, Harry Lee Monroe and Nelson Moore, giving each of them one of his other daughters, Lila Delilah and Lily. The story takes up here with the memory of Charles Moore, who was riding on the horse behind his father, Anderson Moore, when he was shot--along with the remembrances of others:.

Anderson and his son, Charles, had been to the mill to get some corn ground into meal probably at McDowell and were returning home south along Beaver Creek.